Category Archives: lighting cameraman

F&V announce new EVF: SpectraHD 4, 4.3-Inch 720P Screen & HDMI/HD-SDI

At NAB 2014 F&V introduced their first External Viewfinder which could be a solution for the Blackmagic URSA and the AJA CION cameras. These cameras are sold without a viewfinder/eyepiece so you have to add your own. A small monitor will work but a purpose designed eyepiece with a loupe (a place to press your eye against and blocks out sunlight) which flips up is a very versatile piece of kit.

F&V SpectraHD 4
F&V SpectraHD 4

Continue reading F&V announce new EVF: SpectraHD 4, 4.3-Inch 720P Screen & HDMI/HD-SDI

The ARRI AMIRA Hits the Streets of Rio De Janeiro, & the Footage is Absolutely Breathtaking « No Film School

Some fantastic footage from the eagerly awaited new Arri Amira, which shows fantastic 200fps slo-mo and the same great dynamic range and picture quality as it’s bigger brother the Alexa.

…. Filmmaker Jens Hoffman was recently given the chance to finish up his ALEXA-shot documentary MATA MATA, which is about soccer culture and players in Brazil, on a brand new AMIRA, and the footage is breathtaking, to say the very least.

For the past three years, Hoffman has been using his personal ALEXA, which is rigged up for handheld documentary-style work, to document the lives of up and coming Brazilian soccer players. The documentary is called MATA MATA (which translates to “All Or Nothing”)

Although a vast majority of the film was shot on an ALEXA, there were a few scenes that still needed to be shot, and the AMIRA was the obvious choice due to its awesome high-speed functionality. In the film, one of the protagonists recounts playing soccer in the streets of the infamous City of God favela. Hoffman used the AMIRA’s slow motion functionality to create a sense of magical realism for these scenes. Here’s a look at his footage for this scene:

When asked how the AMIRA performed in comparison to his ALEXA, Hoffman had this to say:

The image quality and dynamic range are exactly the same as ALEXA; the only way to tell the AMIRA footage apart is because it’s 200 fps. It was crazy bright in Rio, with very strong sunlight and very dark shadows, so we needed the dynamic range for those extreme contrast levels in the middle of the day, and then we needed the sensitivity once the light started to drop, because it drops fast. Even when it seemed too dark to shoot, we were still getting incredibly nice shots with the AMIRA.

The Amira is certainly looking to be a fantastic new camera, albeit at a relatively high price point compared to some competitors. Is it a case of ‘you get what you pay for….’ ?

via The ARRI AMIRA Hits the Streets of Rio De Janeiro, & the Footage is Absolutely Breathtaking « No Film School. by Robert Hardy

The future of camera technology and resolution

An interesting discussion about the future of camera technology over at The Knowledge

Thirty years ago, the debate about film and TV camera technology was a lot simpler, and they either they cost as much as a car or a house. Since then, technology has advanced faster than anyone predicted, and now it’s feasible to privately own a camera that would have made a 1970s designer bite his pencil in half with astonishment.

How far technology will progress in the next few decades is anyone’s guess, and it’s dangerous to make bold predictions in such a volatile area.

So, let’s live dangerously…

Continue reading The future of camera technology and resolution