Category Archives: Lighting Cameraman London

ON THE COUCH – Zacuto, Rodney Charters, ASC & Bruce Logan, ASC

A really interesting discussion at Cinema 5d from Rodney Charters, ASC, “24” & Bruce Logan, ASC, the original Star Wars films, original TRON,  and Batman Forever, at NAB2014.

Some interesting thoughts on the challenges of lighting for 4k, especially with regard to female actresses and how 4k is taking away some of the DoP’s control as ‘re-framing’ becomes more common.

Another topic was how the lack of a budget for colour correction means DoPs are trying to apply looks with filters etc. while they are shooting.

via NAB 2014 – ON THE COUCH – ep 6 – Zacuto, Rodney Charters, ASC & Bruce Logan, ASC « cinema5D.

Reading a Color Temp Meter: Tips and Tricks | Hurlbut Visuals

Another informative article abut the craft of film making by Shane Hurlbut, lighting in particular. He goes through the basics of how to read a Colour Temperature meter and using that information to balance the lights in your scene – making practical lights and even street-lights more usable for your final image.

Several weeks ago, I went into how to read your light meter and why it is so important.  I know that many of you have said the light meter is dead. Well, you are not on your way to serving yourself well as a cinematographer by thinking this way. You have to have the brick and mortar of light before putting together your creative house.

“Snapshots of Your Color Palette”

Continue reading Reading a Color Temp Meter: Tips and Tricks | Hurlbut Visuals

Understanding Sony’s SLog3. It isn’t really noisy.

Another interesting article by Alister Chapman about Sony’s new Slog3 gamma for the F55 and F5 cameras. Alister explains that even though the untouched footage may look  ‘noisier’ (unwanted ‘grain’ like structure) than the Slog2 setting, once both types of pictures are treated equally there is no more noise in one or the other, in fact there’s more details in the shadows with Slog3 in his opinion.

It’s been brought to my attention that there is a lot of concern about the apparent noise levels when using Sony’s new Slog3 gamma curve. The problem being that when you view the ungraded Slog3 it appears to have more noise in the shadows than Slog2. Many are concerned that this “extra” noise will end up making the final pictures nosier. The reality is that this is not the case, you won’t get any extra noise using Slog3 over Slog2 and Slog3 is generally easier to grade and work with in post production.

So what’s going on?

Continue reading Understanding Sony’s SLog3. It isn’t really noisy.

Cine-EI Mode when recording S-Log2/3 and raw on the F5 and F55. | XDCAM-USER.COM

An interesting article by Sony ‘guru’ Alistair Chapman about recording and exposure techniques on the Sony F55/5 –

Prior to version 3 of the F5 and F55 firmware, Cine-EI was only available in raw mode with the R5 recorder attached. Now from version 3 onwards Cine-EI operation can be selected in both raw and non raw modes. You no longer need to have the R5 attached to use Cine-EI. EI stands for “Exposure Index” and in many respects Cine-EI mode mimics shooting on film.

The latitude and sensitivity of the F5/F55 like most cameras is governed by the latitude and sensitivity of the sensor and processing, which is 14 stops. Different amounts of conventional gain or different ISO’s don’t alter the sensors actual sensitivity to light, only how much the signal from the sensor is amplified.

via Cine-EI Mode when recording S-Log2/3 and raw on the F5 and F55. | XDCAM-USER.COM.